Who we are

Trustees and Directors

Geoffrey de Jager

Chairman

Although he came relatively late to the study of Latin, via his law degree, Geoffrey quickly discovered that the language teaches grammar, logic and process thinking at the highest level.

In his other incarnations, Geoffrey is life president of Oxford Philomusica, honorary life member of Elias Ashmole Group of the Ashmolean Museum, an honorary fellow of Trinity College, Oxford and a patron of the National Galleries Scotland and the Sparrow Schools Foundation.

Nicholas Barber CBE

Honorary President

Nicholas Barber read Greats (Classics) at Oxford, after which he moved to America where he started a classics department at Marlboro College in Vermont.

He then began a long career in the shipping business, rising to chief executive of Ocean Group. He renewed his classical roots when he became a trustee of the British Museum and later chairman of Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum during its recent major rejuvenation project.

He has also chaired a publishing company whose publications included books on classical themes. He is a foundation fellow of Wadham College, Oxford.

 

Jeannie Cohen

Company Secretary

Jeannie’s interest in classics was initiated by the passion of her Latin teacher at school, who offered lunchtime lessons in Greek to anyone who was interested.

Jeannie has taught classics in both the independent and state school systems for many years. She was previously executive secretary to the Joint Association of Classical Teachers and executive secretary of Friends of Classics.

Christopher Clarke

Honorary Treasurer

Christopher is a firm believer in education that has both breadth and depth to prepare children for an ever-changing world; and that the teaching of classics can make a valuable contribution to doing so.

Formerly an investment banker, Christopher was subsequently a deputy chairman of the Competition Commission for six years and a non-executive director of two listed companies.

Carolyn Foreman

Education Consultant

Originally a classicist, Carolyn held senior management posts in education in London, rising to become head of the schools division of the Inner London Education Authority.

She has also served as a governor in state and independent schools and as a trustee and office-holder in several children’s charities, including Shaftesbury Young People and the Sir John Cass Foundation.

Professor Thomas Harrison

Tom’s first brush with Classics (that he can remember) was when he picked up a Penguin translation of Herodotus as a small boy and was dazzled by all the strange names.

He is now an ancient historian, who specialises in Herodotus, Greek religious ideas and in the Greek relationship with the Achaemenid empire. He took both his first degree (in ancient and modern history) and his doctorate at Wadham College, Oxford, and has since taught at UCL, Liverpool, and St Andrews where he is now professor of ancient history.

Tom has been involved in work with schools in Scotland and England for twenty years, chairing the council of the Joint Association of Classical Teachers, helping to develop outreach projects at Liverpool, and especially in supporting school qualifications in ancient history.

Deborah Hughes

Deborah was relatively late in developing her love for Classics, having little exposure to anything that could be described as ancient during her modern history degree at Wadham College, Oxford.

As an experienced senior leader in a north London secondary school, she has been at the front line in introducing Classics to students who have had no previous access to the subject. Having seen first hand the wonderful merits of a classical education for young people, Deborah is now a passionate advocate for access to the subject for all.

Sarah Jackson OBE

Sarah’s love of classics was sparked by Barclay Millar, one of the authors of Ecce Romani, who strode across her classroom at Perth Academy proclaiming ‘ambulo…I walk … ambulance’. She went on to study Classics and Italian at Oxford.

Sarah is CEO for the charity, Working Families, and has more than 20 years experience of managing and fundraising in the not-for-profit sector.

Professor David Langslow

David is professor of classics at Manchester University. He’s a proselytiser for classics and active in promoting CfA with various schools in Greater Manchester. Prior to his arrival at Manchester in January 1999 he was a university lecturer in Latin philology and linguistics in the University of Oxford and a fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford (1984-1998).